Rumors are beginning to form that the Alibaba Group is planning to break some records. Back in 2014, the largest IPO in history was conducted when the company was listed on the New York Stock Exchange. The Alibaba listing managed to raise $25 billion and surpassed the IPOs of other mega-corporations like Google, Facebook and Twitter.

Now it appears that Alibaba is considering the idea of surpassing that record via a listing at the Hong Kong Stock Exchange. Jack Ma is taking Alibaba on this journey in order to look for ways to bolster liquidity and find many new funding streams.

Nothing is set in stone yet, but the CEO and founder of the e-commerce titan has already contacted financial advisors. Jack Ma has allegedly discussed in detail about the possible Alibaba listing and the implications of it.

This course of action from Ma is certainly not coming out of the blue. With the trade war showing no clear winners, he probably thought the time was right. There was already a failed attempt at a Hong Kong exchange listing from Alibaba due to regulation issues. Yes, the largest company in China, with a market cap of over $400 billion, was held back by regulations.

The Alibaba listing should not be a surprise

Even though the company’s shares have declined in value by nearly 20% in the past year alone, the trade wars are calling for harsher measures. The United States government is now clearly hostile to most Chinese companies and it would not be surprising if many of those Chinese companies seek listings on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange.

The trade wars have stopped a $500 million IPO from beginning. Douyu International Holdings is China’s largest gaming stream platform and all plans for a US-based IPO were shredded with the escalation of the trade wars.

There is however, no other company that suffers from the trade war more than Huawei. After the company’s blacklisting, Ren Zhengfei is desperately looking for alternative survival strategies. The build-up to Huawei being blacklisted was long and there currently doesn’t seem to be a favorable solution to both sides in sight.

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